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SSI2-103: Alexander the Great: BEAM

Types of Sources

In academic research, it's important to be able to distinguish between different types of sources.  These differences often are contextual, meaning that a single source might fit in different categories depending on how you are using it and in what academic discipline you are writing.

Primary sources are the raw materials of scholarship.

Secondary sources report on or interpret primary sources.

Tertiary sources synthesize and present overviews of primary and secondary sources.

Scholarly sources present sophisticated, researched arguments using both primary and secondary sources and are written by experts.

Popular sources aim to inform or entertain and are intended for a general, non-specialized audience.  In academic writing, popular sources most often are analyzed as primary sources.

Need a quick review?  Take the online tutorial, which includes a self-assessment quiz at the end.

BEAM Framework

BEAM is an acronym intended to help you think about the various ways you might use sources when writing a researched argument. Joseph Bizup, an English professor at Boston University, outlined the framework in a 2008 article. The idea has since been refined and adapted by many others.

Academic Integrity

This online tutorial gives information and  guidance on academic integrity issues, specifically plagiarism. It provides a set of four exercises to check your learning.

Subject Guide

Peggy Burge's picture
Peggy Burge
Contact:
Collins Library 119
253.879.3512

Peer Research Advisor Hours

Fall 2019 Hours

Ilana Dutton '20 and Kate Roscher '20 are available for research consultations as follows:
 
Sundays   7:00 to 9:00 pm
Mondays   7:00 to 9:00 pm
Tuesdays   7:00 to 9:00 pm
Wednesdays   7:00 to 9:00 pm
 
Collins Library, Library 118 (just off of the Learning Commons)
 
The Research Marathon will be on Nov. 19 and Nov. 20, 7:00 to 11:00 pm.