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ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & DECISION MAKING: SUBJECT GUIDE: Articles

Use this guide to get started with your environmental policy & decision making research!

Finding Scientific Perspectives

Finding Social & Policy Perspective

Key Database: GreenFile

GreenFILE offers well-researched information covering all aspects of human impact to the environment.  Multidisciplinary by nature, GreenFILE draws on the connections between the environment and a variety of disciplines such as agriculture, education, law, health and technology. The database provides indexing and abstracts for approximately 538,000 records, as well as Open Access full text for more than 5,800 records.

Greenfile
Limit Your Results

Key Scientific Database: Biological Sciences

Contains abstracts and citations from over 8000 serials, as well as conference proceedings, technical reports, monographs and selected books and patents within the biological sciences.

Key Policy Database: PAIS International

Subjects covered include global public policy and social issues including culture and religion, human rights, labor policy, media, politics, transportation and more.through periodicals, books, hearings, reports, gray literature, government publications, Internet resources, and other publications from 120 countries.

Environmental Policy Research in Google Scholar

Google Scholar can be a powerful search tool, but it can be inconsistent in its coverage, so it is best if used for supplemental research. See below for best practices for using Google Scholar.

Google Scholar Cited Reference Search

Another useful feature of Google Scholar is its ability to allow for easily finding articles which have cited an article that you have found. 

Step 1: When looking at search results, check for the 'Cited by X' link underneath each result. That will tell you how many subsequent articles (that Google Scholar is aware of...it's not 100% comprehensive! This is a ballpark figure) have cited this particular article.

  • Step 2: Click that link, and you will be taken to a new set of results, all of which have cited the original article, which will still be listed at the top of the page. 

What's a secondary source?

In secondary sources, authors analyze and interpret primary source materials. 

Secondary sources can be scholarly or popular.  Scholarly sources (sometimes called "academic" or "peer-reviewed" sources) are written by and for experts and typically include bibliographies and citations.  Popular sources are written for a general, non-expert audience and can be authored by anyone.

Need Help?

 Stuck? Need Help? This guide is only an introduction to the many resources available to you.  If you have any questions at all, or if you're not finding what you need, don't hesitate to contact Eli!

Eli Gandour-Rood

Science Librarian
egandourrood@pugetsound.edu
tel: (253) 879-3678
office:  Collins Library 117