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BIOl 102: Evolution & Biology of Sex: Home

Science in the Media vs the Scholarly Literature

Knowing how to find the original source from a news or popular press report is a key research skill. It's a good way of getting deeper into the literature for this class, and a good way for you to practice vital research skills that you'll use the rest of your time at UPS. 

Science Has Resolved the Question of Boxers vs. Briefs

Let's take a look at this article and figure out as much citation information as we can from the news story, then we'll try to find the scientific report discussed in the story. 

1) How many scientific studies are mentioned in the article?

 2) What is the OLDEST scientific study that is mentioned? If applicable, note:

  • Name of the journal in which the research was published:
  •  Names of any researchers mentioned:
  •  Title of the article that was published OR important topic words describing the work done in the study:
  •  Approximate date the research was published:

 3) What is the NEWEST scientific study that is mentioned? If applicable, note:

  •  Name of the journal in which the research was published:
  •  Names of any researchers mentioned:
  •  Title of the article that was published OR important topic words describing the work done in the study:
  •  Approximate date the research was published:

4) Now, using that information that you've gathered, search for the original scientific article using one of the following options:

 

Finding Science in the Media

When searching any of these sites for interesting articles or posts about the science of sex, consider using search terms that are either broadly topical (sex/sexuality, mate/mating, reproduction, love) or quite specific, such as anatomical terms (vagina, penis, nipple, sperm, etc) or relevant jargon ("sexual selection" or "mate competition"). 

Check out popular science magazines for science media addressed to a general audience! 

There is a whole world of websites that offer up catchy, "clickbait" style short, accessible articles about science. Many will report on relatively recent findings. 

Try searching on twitter to find scientists promoting their work in an accessible and often light hearted manner! Check out the hashtags #JunkOff and #HumpOff to get you started. 

Newspapers are another good place to look for science journalism. Try one of the databases below, which cover the major news sources in the United States. 

Subject Guide

Eli Gandour-Rood's picture
Eli Gandour-Rood
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