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COMM 344: Rhetorical Theory: Annotated Bibliography/Final Paper

Search Primo

Tipasa: Interlibrary Loan

If your article is not available at Collins Library, you've got another option to getting it. Use Tipasa, our interlibrary loan service.

You'll need to set up an account the first time you use it and log in subsequently.

Once you have an account, either go directly to Tipasa and manually enter the information, or, if you're using a database, look for a shortcut link to automatically fill out the form, like this:

Interlibrary Loan Link

Allow at least a week for the article to come. If your  article is delivered in electronic format, you'll receive an email with a link to follow as soon as it's arrived. If it's delivered in paper, you'll receive it right in your campus mailbox.

From Topic to Research Question to Thesis

Research typically begins with a topic that has piqued your curiosity.  When you're researching a topic, you typically are interested in questions of who, what, where and when.

As you learn more about your chosen topic, however, you'll discover that scholars may have different approaches and arguments about the topic, and you'll start to ask your own research questions.  Research questions typically begin with why or how:

When you've selected a research question to explore and are ready to make an argument as to how to answer it, you'll come up with a thesis.

Search Communication & Mass Media Complete

CMMC incorporates the content of CommSearch (formerly produced by the National Communication Association) and Mass Media Articles Index (formerly produced by Penn State) along with numerous other journals in communication, mass media, and other closely-related fields of study to create a research and reference resource encompassing the breadth of the communication studies discipline.

Recommended Databases for Communication Studies

Search Tips

Don't forget to prepare a list of related terms and concepts BEFORE you begin searching! This will save you time and give you a sense of direction as you search.

Number 1 Search Tip

Use Advanced Search and limit features whenever possible. Subset limits, date limits, citation searches, subject searches, etc. -- are all useful timesavers.

More Search Tips:

  • Start with a general search.
  • Avoid long phrases.
  • When given a choice, go with advanced search.
  • Use AND to find all the words (distinct concepts) on your topic.
  • Use OR to find any of the words (synonyms or related concepts) on your topic.
  • The symbol * is used as a right hand truncation character in most databases; it will find all forms of a word.
  • Use limiters to focus your search by date, full text, peer reviewed articles, etc.
  • Be flexible in your searching.

Too MUCH Information?

  • Use more specific words.
  • Narrow your search by adding more words connecting them with AND.
  • Do a subject search instead of a keyword search.
  • Put phrases in quotation marks.

Too LITTLE Information?

  • Try different search words, including synonyms, broader terms, or related words.
  • Use the truncation symbol * to get all forms of a word.
  • Try a different database.

E-Journal Collections

These e-journal collections provide access to many journals in the field of Communications Studies, but they are limited in scope and coverage compared to subject databases.  In most cases, it's better to search subject databases to identify articles, and then use the Primo Search to access the materials in these e-journal collections.