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EXSC430 Ethics in Sports: Find Articles

Finding Current Events in the News

If you're looking for for news articles about current events, you can try browsing or searching one of the publications listed below.  Note that some publications may have a limit on how much content may be accessed for free. 

Note- To avoid the 10-article limit, UPS users must register and log in to NYTimes.com. Once you’ve registered for an account, which you do from within the campus network (i.e. on-campus), you may “log in” to that account from anywhere, anytime.  To register go to: http://accessnyt.com; Click "Create Account" and complete the registration fields (it is recommended that you use your @pugetsound.edu email address).

Searching can help you narrow in on a particular topic.  Try searching keywords (like 'doping' or 'football and CTE') in any of the two popular press and news databases listed below to search for an article. Each has similar content but a different interface, so try them out and see which one you prefer. All of them allow you to filter your results by date.

Searching Tips

Use these tips and tricks to get the most focused yet comprehensive results on your topic:

Remember to search multiple keywords (like lactate threshold OR anaerobic threshold OR lactic acid) to get more results on your topic.

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Add concepts to your search: use AND to narrow down your search (like anaerobic threshold AND intensity)

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Use subject headings to target your search and find articles that are most relevant to you. PubMed will automatically attempt to search your keyword in the MeSH subject headings; use the 'Details' tab to investigate more and be sure the best subject heading is being used.

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Use truncation symbols to search for multiple forms of a word. In PubMed, SportDiscus, and CINAHL, just add an asterisk (*) where you want the truncation to start. Search for running, runner, run, runs, by entering run*in the search box. 

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Keep track of your strategies, so you don't forget how to find great resources!

Key Database: PubMed

PubMed is your go-to source for searching the medical literature. Use the limits link to narrow your search by language, subject population, or topic subset. When looking at articles, be sure to check for the blue 'Check for full text' button to check for full-text access through Collins Library. 

Key Database: SPORTDiscus with Full Text

SPORTDiscus offers comprehensive, bibliographic coverage of sport, fitness and related disciplines. With full bibliographic coverage, monographs dating back to 1949, and journal coverage to 1975. 

SPORTDiscus with Full Text

Key Database: Proquest Central

Google Scholar Cited Reference Search

One very useful feature of Google Scholar is its ability to allow for easily finding subsequent articles which have cited a particular article that you have located. 

Step 1: When looking at search results, check for the 'Cited by X' link underneath each result. That will tell you how many subsequent articles (that Google Scholar is aware of...it's not 100% comprehensive! This is a ballpark figure) have cited this particular article.

  • Step 2: Click that link, and you will be taken to a new set of results, all of which have cited the original article, which will still be listed at the top of the page. 

Finding Full Text of Articles

There are three methods for obtaining the actual articles you wish to read:

Method 1: In some databases, you will be able to link directly to the full-text article. Look around, as different databases have different interfaces. Look for a link or buttons that says "Check for Full Text" or Download PDF or similar. If given the choice between a PDF or HTML version of the article, always choose the PDF format. This will give you an exact image, including page numbers, of the article as it appears in the paper journal.

Method 2: If a direct link to full text is not available, then check Primo Search to see if the library subscribes to the journal. Search for the title of the journal that the article was published in.

You may find that there is online access available for this journal. Check the dates that are available...most of the time the link will say "Fulltext access available from 19xx." Check to see whether the article that you're looking for was published during the date range that is available. If so, then click the 'View fulltext' link and either browse through past issues, or look for a "search within this publication" link until you find the article that you need.  You may find that Primo says the journal is available at Collins Memorial Library Print Journals, which means we have the journal physically in the library.  If the article you are looking for is only available in print in the library rather than online, in which case you  you will need to check either the current periodicals area on the first floor, or go downstairs to the basement to find the bound volumes of periodicals.  If the periodical is available only in microform, you may submit a request for electronic delivery of the article via your ILL account.

Method 3: If your searching indicates that the article is not available in any format, then request the article through ILL, our interlibrary loan service. (Most databases include links to our ILL within each record.) It usually takes about a week or less to receive an electronic copy of the article.

And at any time if you have questions, send Eli an email!