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Information Literacy Reflection Tool: Introduction

Welcome to the Information Literacy Reflection Tool (ILRT)!

We use information literacy every day in our personal, social, and professional lives as we learn, solve problems, make decisions and communicate.  Information literacy develops over time with practice and changes based on the situation.  This tool is an invitation to notice and appreciate your approaches to gathering and using information, and to recognize the components that make up information literacy. It is not a test with right or wrong answers! You'll have opportunities to take the ILRT during Orientation, in courses you're enrolled in, during library instruction sessions, or on your own as you work on research projects.  You'll receive a copy of your responses each time you take it so that you can compare and reflect on how and why your responses may change over time or in different contexts.

How Can I Take the ILRT?

The ILRT consists of a curated list of statements prompting you to reflect on information use.  Under each heading you'll find a representation of the concepts and strategies that make up an aspect of information literacy.  You may notice some overlap as many of the statements are complementary. 

There are six sections of the ILRT, and you can complete the sections in any order you'd like.  If you are taking the ILRT for Orientation, you should plan to complete all six sections, but you do not need to do so in one sitting if you'd prefer to space them out. Each section takes a couple of minutes to complete, and most students complete all six sections in about 12 minutes. To begin, select a section from the list below or click one of the tabs above.

How do I approach research and inquiry?

How do I engage in scholarly conversations?

How am I strategic while searching?

How do I evaluate information creation?

How do I value information?

How do I think critically about authority?

If you would prefer to access a print copy of the ILRT, you can do so here: http://bit.ly/ilrtcolor

 

How Can I Use the ILRT?

There are many ways to use the ILRT!
Here are just a few ideas:

  • Take it as part of a class or assignment, or use it to reflect on your information literacy outside of class.
  • Take it all at once or focus on one section at a time.
  • Take it multiple times and think about how your relationship to information changes over time and in different contexts.
  • Take it at different stages of a research project (perhaps at the beginning to get in the frame of mind for approaching the inquiry, or at a midway point as a self-check and to get ideas for moving forward).
  • Take the ILRT and have a friend or peer also take it, then have a conversation about where you are similar, different, why, and what strikes you as significant or interesting?
  • Choose one statement and really dig into it -- what does it mean?  Why is it important? How does it relate to you?

Further Information

The contact for the Information Literacy Reflection Tool at Collins Library is Peggy Burge, Associate Director for Public Services.

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