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SSI2-139: The Third Wave: Rock After The Beatles: Starting Points

This library guide is intended as a starting point for the course research paper assignment
This guide is intended as a starting point for an SSI2-139 research paper assignment which requires the use of scholarly sources.

Is it Scholarly?

  

Here are some general guidelines to identify scholarly articles.

Practice

Take a look at the articles below.  Which ones are scholarly?  How can you tell?

  1. Oakes, Jason Lee. "The Filth and the Fury: An Essay on Punk Rock Heavy Metal Karaoke." Current Musicology no. 85 (Spring 2008): 73-112.
  2. Deer, Patrick. "The Cassette Played Poptones." Social Text 31, no. 3 (Fall 2013): 147-158.
  3. Adams, Ruth. "The Englishness of English Punk: Sex Pistols, Subcultures, and Nostalgia." Popular Music & Society 31, no. 4 (October 2008): 469-488
  4. Himes, Geoffrey. "What New Wave Brought to Rock 'n' Roll." Smithsonian 45, no. 5 (September 2014): 1.

Types of Sources

In academic research, it's important to be able to distinguish between different types of sources.  These differences often are contextual, meaning that a single source might fit in different categories depending on how you are using it and in what academic discipline you are writing.

Primary sources are the raw materials of scholarship.

Secondary sources report on or interpret primary sources.

Tertiary sources synthesize and present overviews of primary and secondary sources.

Scholarly sources present sophisticated, researched arguments using both primary and secondary sources and are written by experts.

Popular sources aim to inform or entertain and are intended for a general, non-specialized audience.  In academic writing, popular sources most often are analyzed as primary sources.

Liaison Librarian Information

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Angela Weaver
Contact:
Collins Library 131
253-879-3229